Episode 7: Technology isn’t mysticism

Boone Gorges is the lead developer for the CUNY Academic Commons and a one-time CUNY grad student, making him uniquely qualified to navigate between the technical world and the academic one. As someone who truly believes free and open source software is the pillar of an informed society, I loved speaking with Boone, who can articulately argue that a broad technical understanding of our various systems–from operating systems to algorithms–is an important new literacy. He even makes a compelling case that understanding these systems, and understanding how best to focus our attention, is a form of information literacy, something that speaks to me as a librarian.

Listen now!

Subscribe on iTunes

Episode 4: Wraparound, Episodes 1-3.

In this installment, Steve and Kathleen chat with each other about what they’re reading and who they’re wearing. They also reflect on the three interviews they’ve done so far, finding a set of serendipitous commonalities that also correspond to the idea behind Indoor Voices. They did so at the LaGuardia Community College recording studio where they foresee having future wraparounds, so we all have something to look forward to.

Be sure to enjoy the soothing buzzing of Steve’s phone vibrating during the interview, perhaps pushing out the jackhammers in Barbara Katz Rothman’s interview as the most distracting sound in an episode…

Listen now!

Subscribe on iTunes!

Episode 3: “Corralling scholarly cats…”

As a librarian, there are certain issues, like open access, that I feel I have a pretty firm grip on. When I read Jessie Daniels and Polly Thistlethwaite’s Being a Scholar in the Digital Era: Transforming Scholarly Practice for the Public Good, I knew it would be good, but I didn’t expect many surprises. But the book blew me away in terms of the fantastically interesting takes on what matters to academics—not necessarily to academia—in the 21st century.

This interview, which took place in LaGuardia Community College’s lovely podcast studio, touches on a lot of those issues, but also the fixes for some of the challenges of digital scholarship, such as the tension between wanting to reach a broader audience with your work while also being intimidated by the repercussions of the work being misunderstood.

Listen now!

Subscribe on iTunes!